Some Baking Tin Tips

Basically any type of baking tin can be satisfactory for all your needs...

 

Also as for the type of baking tins to use this could either be Silicon or Aluminium tins are perfectly OK, the most important thing is preparing the tins correctly for the type of cakes or products your making.

 

If you’re making sponge cakes then make sure you first grease inside the tin with margarine or shortening and then a dusting of soft/plain flour tapped over the fat and then tip out the excess, I still do this even with silicone tins “BUT” do not use that flour again for making the actual sponge mixture otherwise the sponge would not have any volume, but you can use the said dusting flour in your next sponge mix or save it to add into a bread mixture.

 

If you’re making a heavy Fruit type cake of Madera type cake then first line the base of the tin/frame with a couple of layers of newspaper and the same way cut to the depth of the tin/frame and then finish off with greaseproof paper...              

 

Please note that in the baking trade Bakers ‘Never’ wash their bread or cake tins they are only lightly scraped out with a plastic scraper so as not to scratch the tins and cleaned with a clean cloth...

 

Also a trick in the profession with new ‘Steel or Aluminium’ bread or cake tins is to first make a mixture of a good dessertspoonful of shortening mixed with a teaspoonful of salt, then brush this over the new tins and put into a ‘WARM’ oven for about 2 hours as this has the effect of adding layer of silicon on the tins,

‘BUT’ do not do this with pre silicone tins          

“Christmas baking Tip”

Once Christmas starts brimming over the horizon in about October then it’s time to start thinking about making your Christmas cake base and Dundee cake so that they have time to mature.

 

So first you need to marinate the dried fruits to be used in the two different types of cake in plenty of alcohol like Brandy and Whisky in an air tight container for at least a month so that the fruit absorbs all the alcohol, give the container a good toss around ‘unopened’ everyday...

 

But note:

Despite what the packs of fruit might say about the fruit already being washed and cleaned still wash the fruit and cherries at least 2-3 times in clean water first and then let them drain before adding the alcohol... 

 

Then by the end of November you will be ready to make the cakes and then once cool wrap them in greaseproof paper and tin foil and store in a cool dark place to mature until ready for decorating the Christmas cake in December, if you wish you can unwrap the cakes once or twice a week and brush them with more alcohol and rewrap them, it will all add to the overall flavour of the cakes.                   

Here is a little bit of useless baking information:

 
When and if you use bananas in a pie or any other type of cooked desert then I would always first cut the banana into thick slices then lightly coat in lemon juice and then just gently blanch the banana in a very light sugar syrup, then drain them and leave to cool then add to my pie type filling...
Blanching the bananas in this a way to prevent them from going brown or black...
 

And that’s the end of today’s bit of useless information!

 

 

Here is another little bit of useless information:

 

Did you know that it’s very easy to make your OWN Baking Powder!

 

All you need is:

 

2 teaspoons of plain flour or cornstarch

2 teaspoons of cream a Tartar, chemically know as (potassium hydrogen tartrate)

1 teaspoon of Baking Soda, chemically know as (sodium bicarbonate)

 

Place all the ingredients into a fine sifter and sift together three times to make sure that all the ingredients are entire mixed together.

Then store in an air tight container

 

Note: The flour or cornstarch is used as what we call the (Carrying Agent) and will stop the baking powder from going hard…

 

And that’s the end of today’s bit of useless information!

 

 

Here is another little bit of useless information:

 

Did you know that if and when using instant dried yeast that if you should not use all of the yeast at one baking then just seal up the packet tightly with an elastic band and store it in the freezer, this will help to maintain the yeasts activity…

 

If you just keep it in a container in the kitchen then the activity of the yeast will deteriorate very quickly thus not giving a good fermentation…      

 

And that’s the end of today’s bit of useless information!     

 

Here is another little bit of useless information:

 

Did you know that when you need to use egg-wash to brush any pastries and cookies to give them a good shine, before using the egg-wash first beat in a pinch of salt which will break down the streaky elastic gluten content of the Egg White resulting in a smooth egg-wash to coat your products… 

 

And that’s the end of today’s bit of useless information!

 

 

Here is another little bit of useless information:

 

Did you know that despite what any fruit cake recipe might say to the otherwise, you should NEVER dust your fruit in ‘Flour’ to prevent it from sinking as that is an old fallacy, all it will do as the cake is baking is to form a hard flour crust round the fruit which will spoil the eating quality. The fruit with stay distributed in the fruit cake properly due to the density of the batter!

And that’s the end of today’s useless bit of information…

 

Here is another little bit of useless information:

 

Basically any type of baking tin or pan can be satisfactory for all your needs...

 

As for the type of baking tins to use this could either be Silicon or Aluminium tins are perfectly OK, the most important thing is preparing the tins correctly for the type of cakes or products your making.

 

If you’re making sponge cakes then make sure you first grease inside the tin with margarine or shortening and then a dusting of soft/plain flour tapped over the fat and then tip out the excess, I still do this even with silicone tins “BUT” do not use that flour again for making the actual sponge mixture otherwise the sponge would not have any volume, but you can use the said dusting flour in your next sponge mix or save it to add into a bread mixture.

 

If you’re making a heavy Fruit type cake of Madera type cake then first line the base of the tin/frame with a couple of layers of newspaper and the same way cut to the depth of the tin/frame and then finish off with greaseproof paper...              

 

Please note that in the baking trade Bakers ‘Never’ wash their bread or cake tins they are only lightly scraped out with a plastic scraper so as not to scratch the tins and cleaned with a clean cloth...

 

Also a trick in the profession with new ‘Steel or Aluminium’ bread or cake tins is to first make a mixture of a good dessertspoonful of shortening mixed with a teaspoonful of salt, then brush this over the new tins and put into a ‘WARM’ oven for about 2 hours as this has the effect of adding layer of silicon on the tins.

 

‘BUT’ do not do this with pre silicone tins         

 

“Conversion tables”

Maybe this will help some of you with converting grams to Cups

 

All these are approximate conversions, which have either been rounded up or down. In a few recipes, it has been necessary to modify them very slightly. Never mix metric and imperial measures in one recipe; stick to one system or the other. 

All spoon measurement means a level spoonful, unless specified otherwise.

All butter is salted, unless specified otherwise.

Weights

 

Dimensions

 

Imperial

Metric

Imperial

Metric

½ oz 
¾ oz 
1 oz 
1½ oz 
2 oz 
2½ oz 
3 oz 
4 oz 
4½ oz 
5 oz 
6 oz 
7 oz 
8 oz 
9 oz 
10 oz 
12 oz 
1 lb 
1 lb 8 oz 
2 lb 
3 lb

10 g 
20 g 
25 g 
40 g 
50 g 
60 g 
75 g 
110 g 
125 g 
150 g 
175 g 
200 g 
225 g 
250 g 
275 g 
350 g 
450 g 
700 g 
900 g 
1.35 kg

¹⁄₈ inch 
¼ inch 
½ inch 
¾ inch 
1 inch 
1¼ inch 
1½ inch 
1¾ inch 
2 inch 
2½ inch 
3 inch 
3½ inch 
4 inch 
5 inch 
5¼ inch 
6 inch 
6½ inch 
7 inch 
7½ inch 
8 inch 
9 inch 
9½ inch 
10 inch 
11 inch 
12 inch

3 mm 
5 mm 
1 cm 
2 cm 
2.5 cm 
3 cm 
4 cm 
4.5 cm 
5 cm 
6 cm 
7.5 cm 
9 cm 
10 cm 
13 cm 
13.5 cm 
15 cm 
16 cm 
18 cm 
19 cm 
20 cm 
23 cm 
24 cm 
25.5 cm 
28 cm 
30 cm

 

 

Volume

 

 

 

 

 Imperial

Metric 

     

2 fl oz 
3 fl oz 
5 fl oz (¼ pint) 
10 fl oz (½ pint) 
1 pint 
1 ¼ pint 
1 ¾ pint 
2 pint 
2½ pint 
4 pint

55 ml 
75 ml 
150 ml 
275 ml 
570 ml 
725 ml 
1 litre 
1.2 litre 
1.5 litre 
2.25 litres

     

 

 

Oven Temperatures

 

Gas Mark

 

 

 

 

°F 

 

 

 

 

°C 









9

 275°F 
300°F 
325°F 
350°F 
375°F 
400°F 
425°F 
450°F 
475°F

140°C 
150°C 
170°C 
180°C 
190°C 
200°C 
220°C 
230°C 
240°C

               

 

If using a fan oven you will need to reduce the oven temperature in a recipe by 20 degrees.

  

American Cup Conversions

 

 

 Liquid Conversions

 

 

American 

Imperial 

Metric 

 Imperial

Metric 

American 

1 cup flour 
1 cup caster/ granulated sugar 
1 cup brown sugar 
1 cup butter/margarine/lard 
1 cup sultanas/raisins 
1 cup currants 
1 cup ground almonds 
1 cup golden syrup 
1 cup uncooked rice 
1 cup grated cheese 
1 stick butter

5oz 

8oz 
6oz 
8oz 
7oz 
5oz 
4oz 
12oz 
7oz 
4oz 
4oz

150g 

225g 
175g 
225g 
200g 
150g 
110g 
350g 
200g 
110g 
110g

½ fl oz
1 fl oz 
2 fl oz
4 fl oz
8 fl oz
16 fl oz

15 ml
30 ml
60 ml
120 ml
240 ml
480 ml

1 tbsp
1/8 cup
¼ cup 
½ cup
1 cup
1 pint

 

Note: A pint isn't always a pint: in British, Australian and often Canadian recipes you'll see an imperial pint listed as 20 fluid ounces. American and some Canadian recipes use the American pint measurement, which is 16 fluid ounces.

 

 

Volume Conversions: Normally used for liquids only

Customary quantity

Metric equivalent

1 teaspoon

5 mL

1 tablespoon or 1/2 fluid ounce

15 mL

1 fluid ounce or 1/8 cup

30 mL

1/4 cup or 2 fluid ounces

60 mL

1/3 cup

80 mL

1/2 cup or 4 fluid ounces

120 mL

2/3 cup

160 mL

3/4 cup or 6 fluid ounces

180 mL

1 cup or 8 fluid ounces or half a pint

240 mL

1 1/2 cups or 12 fluid ounces

350 mL

2 cups or 1 pint or 16 fluid ounces

475 mL

3 cups or 1 1/2 pints

700 mL

4 cups or 2 pints or 1 quart

950 mL

4 quarts or 1 gallon

3.8 L

Note: In cases where higher precision is not justified, it
may be convenient to round these conversions off as follows: 
  1 cup = 250 mL 
  1 pint = 500 mL 
  1 quart = 1 L 
  1 gallon = 4 L

 

 

Weights of common ingredients in grams

Ingredient

1 cup

3/4 cup

2/3 cup

1/2 cup

1/3 cup

1/4 cup

2 Tbsp

Flour, all purpose (wheat)

120 g

90 g

80 g

60 g

40 g

30 g

15 g

Flour, well sifted all purpose (wheat)

110 g

80 g

70 g

55 g

35 g

27 g

13 g

Sugar, granulated cane

200 g

150 g

130 g

100 g

65 g

50 g

25 g

Confectioner's sugar (cane)

100 g

75 g

70 g

50 g

35 g

25 g

13 g

Brown sugar, packed firmly (but not too firmly)

180 g

135 g

120 g

90 g

60 g

45 g

23 g

Corn meal

160 g

120 g

100 g

80 g

50 g

40 g

20 g

Corn starch

120 g

90 g

80 g

60 g

40 g

30 g

15 g

Rice, uncooked

190 g

140 g

125 g

95 g

65 g

48 g

24 g

Macaroni, uncooked

140 g

100 g

90 g

70 g

45 g

35 g

17 g

Couscous, uncooked

180 g

135 g

120 g

90 g

60 g

45 g

22 g

Oats, uncooked quick

90 g

65 g

60 g

45 g

30 g

22 g

11 g

Table salt

300 g

230 g

200 g

150 g

100 g

75 g

40 g

Butter

240 g

180 g

160 g

120 g

80 g

60 g

30 g

Vegetable shortening

190 g

140 g

125 g

95 g

65 g

48 g

24 g

Chopped fruits and vegetables

150 g

110 g

100 g

75 g

50 g

40 g

20 g

Nuts, chopped

150 g

110 g

100 g

75 g

50 g

40 g

20 g

Nuts, ground

120 g

90 g

80 g

60 g

40 g

30 g

15 g

Bread crumbs, fresh, loosely packed

60 g

45 g

40 g

30 g

20 g

15 g

8 g

Bread crumbs, dry

150 g

110 g

100 g

75 g

50 g

40 g

20 g

Parmesan cheese, grated

90 g

65 g

60 g

45 g

30 g

22 g

11 g